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What is BLENTA

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

This is new name for my lunar electric car project on Moon.

Boschnjak Lunar Electric Night Terrain Automobile

A Moon and Mars vehicle for off roads driving, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal electric motor and able to carry a small number of people. 

BLENTA is similar as new version of this vehicle shown in video.

 

The new rover lunar has to be created from scratch.

Definitions

1.      Lunar Surface Science Mobility System (LSSMS):   A mobile platform or vehicle able to traverse the lunar surface and provide operational services to a payload. 

2.      Payload:  Active and/or passive hardware individually, or in a suite, for the purposes of in situ investigations aligned with exploration and science objectives, and/or technology demonstration goals.

3.      Payload Operational Services:  The combined set of physical accommodations (pointing, field of view, etc.), utilities (e.g., power, commanding, data, etc.), and environmental controls (e.g., thermal, EMI/EMC, etc.) provided to a payload by its hosting platform to enable operation.

4.      Payload Integration:  The function of physically and functionally integrating a payload into the LSSMS.  This includes development of necessary analysis, designs, and plans in advance of physical integration.

5.      Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS):  A project in the Office of the Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration (DAAX) that brokers, on a pay-for-service basis, access to the lunar surface.  Respondents should assume that the LSSMS will be deployed onto the lunar surface via a CLPS lander and should, in their responses, identify at a conceptual level, the features and capability such a lander would need to have in order to facilitate egress from the lander.  (E.g., ramp angle limits or step limits.)

As is appropriate to provide, the specific types of information sought include, and is not limited to, the following:

  1. Description of LSSMS capability that includes:
    • An overview of the LSSMS concept and design including identification of any partnerships (with current levels of commitment), as well as any necessary additional systems needed for the LSSMS to function. (e.g., ground stations, orbiting assets, etc.)  Additionally, please identify the types of design and construction standards you would prefer to use (e.g. MIL-STD, NASA, ANSI, ISO, Proprietary, etc.).  Do not list the specific standards.
    • A description of the current maturity of the LSSMS design and/or development, or (as applicable) the maturity of the terrestrial system upon which the LSSMS would be based, along with a description of the key adaptation challenges. Include any significant tests and demonstrations that have already occurred or are planned.  
    • To the degree it is practicable, descriptions of the deployed lunar-surface capability including payload accommodation, operational lifespan, darkness survival capability, surface speed and range.
  2. To the degree practicable, a schedule that illustrates a credible path to the described LSSMS deployment on the lunar surface as early as reasonably achievable, including a description of uncertainties, challenges, and risks to that schedule.  Describe any management, monitoring, or procurement innovations you would apply to accelerate schedule and reduce schedule risk. Schedule should include major activities and milestones including when payloads would need to be provided for integration to the LSSMS to make the intended deployment date.
  3. Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost information:
    • To the degree practicable, relevant ROM cost information for the development of the described LSSMS with phasing and sufficient basis of estimate to convey the assumed scope.  Describe any management, monitoring, or procurement innovations you would apply to reduce cost and cost risk.  Respondents should recommend a contract type they feel would be the best value to the Government and ensure the objective schedule. 
    • Per unit production ROM costs for repeat builds.  Respondents should assume that repeat builds may vary the provided payload within the initial capability, but otherwise the same design as the first. Respondents should assume repeat builds would be procured in a firm-fixed price (FFP) contract type.

To generate the above schedule and cost information, respondents should assume the following scope is included in providing the LSSMS.  As stated earlier, it is permissible and preferred that respondents stay within the aspects that they know and understand and may use this scope as a guide.  If cost and schedule information provided is based upon something other than the below, respondents are asked to describe the scope that was actually assumed:

Overall:

·         Provide all necessary facilities and infrastructure to develop and deliver the LSSMS.

·         Perform effective project management of resources, schedule, risks and opportunities against a baseline with appropriate management tools, reviews, and reporting

·         Provide support to meet applicable legal, regulatory, and policy requirements.

Manage and perform all necessary tasks to design, manufacture, assemble, integrate and test the LSSMS described herein.

·         Manage system requirements and their verifications.

·         Hold appropriate design, integration, test, and delivery reviews.

·         Support development of interface control documentation between the LSSMS and a lander.

·         Support integration onto a lander including exchange of necessary models, analysis, data, and documentation.

Manage and perform the integration of NASA payload(s) onto/into the LSSMS including engineering and mission support:

·         In coordination with NASA payload developers, develop and verify any necessary interface control documentation, environmental specifications, and analyses.

·         Provide the necessary hardware, tooling, and procedures to achieve payload integration onto/into the LSSMS.

·         Manage and perform the integration of payloads into the LSSMS and complete appropriate checkout activities.

FIRST PRELIMINARY BLENTA  SPECIFICATION

Four-wheel drive is mandatory to explore uncharted territory, so the rover would use four electric motors. The onboard electronics could calculate the precise amount of torque each wheel needs to get the rover through a rut, or to power it over loose terrain. If the left front and right rear wheels are stuck, for example, the remaining two can move it along, something that’s difficult to achieve (though not impossible) with a dual-motor power train.

The Artemis lunar exploration program launched by NASA in 2017 could put men and women on the moon by 2024. It’s been a while since we visited, so the agency is starting from scratch, and needs a new exploration vehicle for its astronaut. To that end, it’s asking American companies (including automakers and tech firms) to help design it.

NASA published the project’s basic guidelines on its website. It wants the next lunar rover to be electric, which goes without saying. It envisions a vehicle with a cabin that isn’t pressurized, and that humans can drive.  Because the moon doesn’t (yet) have a Department of Transportation in charge of paving roads, the rover must tackle challenging terrain. The agency predicts lessons learned from the project will benefit the auto industry.

“We want our rovers on the moon to draw on, and spur, innovations in electric vehicle energy storage and management, autonomous driving, and extreme environment resistance,” said Marshall Smith, NASA’s director of human lunar exploration programs, in a statement.


“We also want to hear from industry leaders in all-terrain vehicles, electric vehicles, and more—this is not exclusive to the space industry,” notes Smith. “We want our rovers on the Moon to draw on, and spur, innovations in electric vehicle energy storage and management, autonomous driving, and extreme environment resistance.”

Clarke added, “Companies of all sizes are already partnering with us to deliver payloads to the lunar surface through our Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) initiative. We look forward to what industry shares with us as we consider early ideas on how humanity will explore the Moon robotically and with crew in the coming years.”

Increasing mobility on the Moon is the latest step to strengthen NASA’s Artemis program, where the agency will use the Moon to test new systems and technologies before sending crew to Mars in the 2030s.

The agency will soon select new providers to design and develop a Human Landing System as well as new logistics suppliers for the Gateway in lunar orbit. And, as Clarke mentioned, NASA is continuing to accelerate its scientific work ahead of a human return, working with a pool of 14 companies on contract to bid on commercial Moon deliveries.

Two of those providers, Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines, will deliver the first sets of science instruments and technology development payloads to the lunar surface next year.

REPLICA OF NASA APOLLO ELECTRIC VEHICLE

A Moon and Mars vehicle for off roads driving, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal electric motor and able to carry a small number of people.

“We also want to hear from industry leaders in all-terrain vehicles, electric vehicles, and more—this is not exclusive to the space industry,” notes Smith. “We want our rovers on the Moon to draw on, and spur, innovations in electric vehicle energy storage and management, autonomous driving, and extreme environment resistance.”

Clarke added, “Companies of all sizes are already partnering with us to deliver payloads to the lunar surface through our Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) initiative. We look forward to what industry shares with us as we consider early ideas on how humanity will explore the Moon robotically and with crew in the coming years.”

Increasing mobility on the Moon is the latest step to strengthen NASA’s Artemis program, where the agency will use the Moon to test new systems and technologies before sending crew to Mars in the 2030s. The agency will soon select new providers to design and develop a Human Landing System as well as new logistics suppliers for the Gateway in lunar orbit. And, as Clarke mentioned, NASA is continuing to accelerate its scientific work ahead of a human return, working with a pool of 14 companies on contract to bid on commercial Moon deliveries. Two of those providers, Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines, will deliver the first sets of science instruments and technology development payloads to the lunar surface next year.

NASA Lunar Rover Virtual Industry Forum Feb. 12, 2020

Affiliation Participation List • First name - Last name

ABB, Joel Kirkham

Advanced Materials Devices, Barjan Kavlicoglu

Aerospace, Frank Bauer

Aerospace Corp DBA, Natalie Mary

Airbus, Mark Kinnersley

Altair Engineering, Brian Brothers

Altair Engineering, James Gilbert

Altair Engineering, Edward Wettlauser

ASP, Julian Miller

Astrobotic, Dan Hendrickson

AVL, James La Bonte

Ball Aerospace, Melissa Sampson

Barron Industries, David Melampy

Blue Origin, Will Chambers

Blue Origin, A.C. Charania

Boeing, Cindy Mahler

Boeing Company, Derek Garza

Caladin, Thomas Velez

Center for Automotive Research, Mike Shapiro

Central Supplier, Mark Potter

College for Creative Studies, Alecia Haney

Collins Aerospace, Gary Adamson

Collins Aerospace, Greg Guyette

Consultant to NASA, Rob Meyerson

Contrator, Elmar Boerner

Coupi Inc, Jerome Johnson

Detroit Regional Partnership, Connie Loh

DQST, Gurvin Derchohas

Draper, John West

Dynamic Concepts Inc, Marc Jarmulowicz

FEV, Brandon Bartneck

FEV, Sharif Matta

First Mode, Tristan Helms

Flir, Tung Ng

Flir Systems, Jennifer Rocklis

General Motors, Nigel Sutton

Greater Houston Economic Developement Corp, Bethany Miller

Honey Bee Robotics, Dean Bergman

HTR, Vas Bantou

HU Kentucky, Wil James

IHMC, Robert Griffin

Independent, Adriana Walker

INEC, Susana Zanello

Jet Co Solutions, Paul Costopulos

JPL, Laura Jones-Wilson

KBR, Steve Chappell

Locked Martin, David Murrow

Lockheed Martin, Robert Chambers

Lockheed Martin, Timothy Cichan

Lockheed Martin, Josh Hopkins

Lockheed Martin, David Murrow

Lockheed Martin, Chris Nie

Lunar, Justin Cyrus

Lunar Outpost, AJ Gemer

Lunar Outpost, Colby Moxham

Maxar, Laurie Chappell

Maxar, Andrew Conners

Maxar Sean Dougherty

Maxar, Atif Qureshi

Maxar, Al Tadros

Maxar Technologies, John Lymer

MI Economic Development Corporation, Nick Anderson

Mission Controls Space Services, Kaizad Raimalwala

Motive Space Systems, Chris McQuin

MS State University, Matthew Doud

NA, George Foy

NEYA, Alon Yaari

Northrop Grumman, Tim Cable

Northrop Grumman, Derek Hodgins

Northrop Grumman, Justin Lazear

Northrop Grumman, Herve Tokoto

Northrop Grumman, Doyle Towles

Northrup Gruman, Ed Belte

Northrup Grumman, John Dyster

Northrup Grummond, Rick Mastracchio

Oceanering Space Systems, Jud Hedgecock

Osh Kosh Corp, Alex Bare

Osh Kosh Corp, Mark Charniak

Osh Kosh Corp, Ryan Wojcik

Phillips 66, Elzie Black

Polaris, Tony Kinsman

Polaris, Amber Malone

Polaris industries Jaysen Ealy

Polaris Industries, Jason Ely

Polaris Industries, George Liu

Polaris Industries, Aidan Shaughnessy

Pratt Miller, Robert Prohaska

Protean, Electric Robyn Hughes

Protean Electric, Ahmad Kilani

Proto Innovations LLC, Georgia Crowther

Public, John Leichty

Raytheon, Jeff Puschell

Retired NASA Engineer, Ron Creel

Rivian Automotive, John Behrendt

Rocky Martin, Ian Ferguson

SBC Alexander, Van Dijk

SCOPS, Michael Johnson

Sierra NV Corp, Jeff Hickerson

Site Scientist, Mehran Biji

Space Application Services, Jeremy Ganct

SpaceWorks, John Bradford

SpaceWorks, Mark Schaffer

SpaceX, Charles Kuehmann

SpaceX, Aarti Matthews

Student at University of Kentuckyt, Paria Nossaver

Sub Contractor, Rodger Roverkemp

Sunday America Technical Center, John Suh

Supplier, David LaRue

Supplier, Mark Partter

Syncroness, Chris Perkins

Syncroness Inc, Austin Howell

Teledine Brown Engineering, James Mitchell

Teledyne Brown, Erik Withee

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Paul Armbrester

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Jimmy Eckles

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Paul Galloway

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Lee Jankowski

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Mark Langford

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Greg Lawson

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Ed Massey

Teledyne Brown Engineering, Mark McElyea

Textron, Jack McDougall

The Technical University of Munich, Martin Losekamm

UCLA, Peter Chi

University of Cincinnati, Gregory Gosian

University of Kentucky, Suzanne Smith

Venturi Astrolab, Rius Billing

WeSpace Technologies, Yigal Harel

Xplore, Adam Schilffarth

 

 

 

 

 

BLENTA - Boschnjak Lunar Electric Night Terrain Automobile

 

 

SOME OF IDEAS AS UNKNOWN MODEL CHASSIS PRINCIPLE

 

 

 

NASA ARTIST IMAGE

 

 

 

Prava kopiranja.  Sva prava pridržana.  Rudolf Bošnjak. Bosna i Hercegovina.
Copyright.  All rights reserved.  Rudolf Boschnjak. Bosnia and Herzegovina.